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Fuel-efficient driving techniques by the Department of Natural Resources Canada

If one of your resolutions is to save money, or be more conscious of your expenses or even help the environment, we have a way you can do all these.

The ShipMyRide team did some research on an interesting topic, which is how we can be more fuel-efficient while driving.

Fuel-efficient driving can save Canadians hundreds of dollars in fuel yearly, improve road safety and prevent wear and tear on your vehicle. By adopting these 5 fuel-efficient driving techniques, you can lower your vehicle’s fuel consumption daily and carbon dioxide emissions by as much as 25%.

1. Accelerate gently


The harder you push your gas pedal, the more fuel you will be using. In the city, you can use less fuel by easing onto the gas pedal gently. For example, to be as fuel-efficient as possible, take 5 seconds to accelerate your vehicle up to 20 kilometres per hour from a stop.

TIP: Imagine you have an open cup of coffee on the dashboard. Don’t spill it!

2. Maintain a steady speed


When your speed drops and spikes, you are using more fuel, and spending more money. Tests have shown that varying your speed up and down between 75 and 85 km per hour every 18 seconds can increase your fuel use by 20%.



TIP: Where conditions permit, use cruise control for highway driving.


3. Anticipate traffic


Be mindful and look at your surroundings while driving to see what is coming up.

Always keep a comfortable distance between your vehicle and the one in front of you.

By looking closely at what pedestrians and the vehicles around you are doing, and imagining what they’ll do next, you can keep your speed as steady as possible and use less fuel.



BONUS: It’s also safer to drive this way.


4. Avoid high speeds


Drive the speed limit and save on fuel – it’s as simple as that!

Most cars, vans, pickup trucks and SUVs are most fuel-efficient when they’re travelling between 50 and 80 km per hour.



FOR EXAMPLE: at 120 km per hour, a vehicle uses about 20% more fuel than at 100 km per hour. On a 25-km trip, this spike in speed – and fuel consumption – would cut just two minutes from your travel time.


5. Coast to decelerate


Every time you use your brakes, you waste your forward momentum. By looking ahead at how traffic is behaving, you can often see well in advance when it’s time to slow down. You will conserve fuel and save money by taking your foot off the pedal and coasting to slow down instead of using your brakes. Take your time, and be present when driving, always looking and anticipating.

We hope these tips will work for you and you start practicing some of them.

If you are moving, don't drive your vehicle. Save on fuel and carbon emissions by shipping your vehicle with ShipMyRide!

Get your free car shipping quote at 888-875-7447.



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